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Asperger Subtype: "The Emotion Boy"

This is the most difficult type to deal with because rules and reasons mean much less to him or her. Many of the Asperger children fall into one of the emotion types. Their emotions control their behaviors. If you do not recognize and deal with their emotions, your success is diminished. This group has many more tantrums, is less available, easily disengages, or is more prone to acting out. Those dealing with the Emotion Boy can often find themselves in a state of frustration at best and a crisis state at worst. The vast majority of this group will end upon medications for their issues because their coping strategies are poorly developed and inadequate to meet the demands of the world. Fortunately, the right medication and an effective behavioral plan can do wonders.

Paranoid Boy
By far, this is the most difficult type. Fortunately, their numbers are small. Some other subtypes may have characteristics similar to this type, but not all. He sees the world from an adversarial point of view. The world is against him. Everyone is out to get him and no one can be trusted. The only coping strategy he has is to maintain a good "offense" and so he attacks before others do or say anything. Even the slightest issue is a source of provocation. Once he begins his attack he can be relentless, and keep coming at you until he is exhausted. If he is younger, you might have the stamina to deal with this. If he is older, the police are often called. These children are unusually bright. Their thinking involves violent themes and their actions are hostile and aggressive to others. They want to "fire, murder, devour, shoot, destroy" people who go against them in any situation, no matter how trivial. Typically, they receive multiple diagnoses, often oppositional defiant disorder or some other psychiatric condition such as bipolar disorder.

Recommended Approach: Since this is the most difficult type by far, you must take extraordinary means to help these children. Placating your child or "walking on eggshells" will only give you a momentary reprieve. Most parents of these children refrain from physical interventions, but may be using a good deal of restraining techniques. This again is a temporary solution. To begin with, you must seek professional help, in terms of both medication and behavioral interventions. You must maintain calmness in your interactions with these children. Only the most powerful reinforcers may be of some use. A highly structured environment with firmness is needed, along with great persistence and patience. Dealing with this type is something you don't do alone.



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From Parenting Your Asperger Child by Alan Sohn, Ed.D., and Cathy Grayson, M.A. Copyright 2005. Used by arrangement with Penguin Group (USA) Inc.

If you'd like to buy this book, click here or on the book cover. Get a 15% discount with the coupon code FENPARENT.


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