|

Expert Iconexpert advice MORE

Honors Student's Grades Slip

Toddler and Teenager Expert Advice from Carleton Kendrick, Ed.M., LCSW

Q: My daughter is in 10th grade and is taking all honors level classes. She has never brought home more than one B on her report card and it has always been in math. However, she received 4 B's and two A's on her first report card as a sophomore. I realize this is not the end of the world, but I feel I need to do something as I feel her commitment is lacking. She has the potential to achieve all A's or close to it. Please offer some advice and/or some suggested reading. Thanks in advance.

A: My advice is to continue to offer her encouragement and appreciation for her efforts as a student, while showing her that you understand how difficult it must be, at times, to maintain her honors level coursework, her social life and her extracurricular activities. I would not tell her that you are disappointed in her or that you know that she should be getting all A's.

Ask her how she feels about her grades this term. More importantly, ask her opinion of the courses themselves -- are they challenging and well taught, etc. Which courses are her favorites? Why? In the course of open-ended, non-judgmental discussions like this, her assessment of her grades and what she thinks she'll have to put forth academically will probably surface. If you indicate that poor grades are problems to be worked on rather than "the end of the world," she will be far more encouraged to think about how to improve them.

Remember that she will probably bring home a variety of grades throughout her high school career. How you respond to them and to her will have a significant effect on her school achievement. Paying attention to other parts of her life will let her know that you view her as much more than just a kid who should be getting all A's. She should never be made to feel that she is valued only if she always lives up to your sense of her academic potential. Thanks for writing.

More on: Expert Advice

Carleton Kendrick has been in private practice as a family therapist and has worked as a consultant for more than 20 years. He has conducted parenting seminars on topics ranging from how to discipline toddlers to how to stay connected with teenagers. Kendrick has appeared as an expert on national broadcast media such as CBS, Fox Television Network, Cable News Network, CNBC, PBS, and National Public Radio. In addition, he's been quoted in the New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Boston Globe, USA Today, Reader's Digest, BusinessWeek, Good Housekeeping, Woman's Day, and many other publications.


Please note: This "Expert Advice" area of FamilyEducation.com should be used for general information purposes only. Advice given here is not intended to provide a basis for action in particular circumstances without consideration by a competent professional. Before using this Expert Advice area, please review our General and Medical Disclaimers.

stay connected

Sign up for our free email newsletters and receive the latest advice and information on all things parenting.

Enter your email address to sign up or manage your account.

Facebook icon Twitter icon Follow Us on Pinterest

editor’s picks

highlights

Printable Spring Fun To-Do List
Enjoy the warmer weather by using this printable checklist of fun springtime activities for your whole family.

Kindergarten Readiness App
It's kindergarten registration time! Use this interactive kindergarten readiness checklist, complete with fun games and activities, to practice the essential skills your child needs for this next big step. Download the Kindergarten Readiness app today!

Top 10 Earth Day Books for Children
Celebrate the environment by reading some of these great children's books about Earth Day, recycling, planting trees, and all things green!

Prom Dress Trends for 2014
Check out 2014 prom dress trends inspired by celebrities’ red carpet looks, but with a price tag under $100!