Galactic Hot Dogs
 
Home > Kids > Behavior and Discipline > Communicating With Your Child > The Natural Progression of Your Child's Communication
|

The Natural Progression of Your Child's Communication

Your child is capable of communicating his basic needs right from day one. As time marches on, he gradually learns more about communicating his wants and needs to you and others. This is the natural progress of communication.

Birth to Age Two

Most newborn to three-month-old babies can distinguish between pitch and volume of sound. Cooing and making soft noises will get your newborn's attention and help her feel secure. You can never talk too much to children in this age group. As they begin to notice the different things that you are doing, verbalize the actions. "Let's change your diaper" and "Mommy is turning out the light" may seem silly to say to a baby, but she loves to hear the sound of your voice. She will communicate with you by her actions—crying, smiling, and babbling. As infants come close to the age of one, they will be able to imitate expressions, associate simple gestures with words such as waving and saying hi, and respond to a firm "no."

When your child gets closer to the age of two, she may begin to think that her name is "no," and you may also think that it is the only word left in your vocabulary. That's perfectly normal. Children in this age range can say six to twenty words, but they understand many more. They start learning simple phrases and respond correctly to simple questions, such as "What?"

Ages Three to Five

Between the ages of three and five, quite a bit of language development occurs. Children go from joining similar words to make phrases to being able to retell a story. At age three, your child will be able to follow a series of two to four related directions, and he will be able to sing a song and repeat a line or two of his favorite story.

Fact

About 5 percent of school-age children have speech and language disorders, including voice disorders and stuttering. These disorders are handled through speech therapy often provided by the public school system.

At the ages of four and five, your child will be able to retell a story, but she may confuse the order. She will combine different thoughts into one sentence, listen to long stories, and be able to follow a more complex set of directions. She will be able to use "because" and "so" casually in a conversation and begin to use words like "might," "should," and "can."



Next: Ages 6-17 >>
|

From The Everything Parent's Guide to Raising a Successful Child Copyright © 2004, F+W Publications, Inc. Used by permission of Adams Media, an F+W Publications Company. All rights reserved.

To order this book go to Amazon.


highlights

Top 10 Sweet 16 Birthday Gifts
Your daughter's sweet 16 is a big milestone in her life. Celebrate this special occasion with one of these top gifts for girls turning 16.

Find Today's Newest & Best Children's Books!
Looking for newly released books for your child? Try our new Book Finder tool to search for new books by age, type, and theme, brought to you by Galactic Hot Dogs.

Printable Lists of the Top 100 Baby Names
Need help with baby name ideas? Use our printable list of the top 100 girl names and top 100 boy names of 2015 to help you brainstorm and narrow down your favorites.

Registered for Kindergarten — Now What?
Wondering what to do now that you've signed your child up for kindergarten? Try our award-winning Kindergarten Readiness app! This easy-to-use checklist comes with games and activities to help your child build essential skills for kindergarten. Download the Kindergarten Readiness app today!

stay connected

Sign up for our free email newsletters and receive the latest advice and information on all things parenting.

Enter your email address to sign up or manage your account.

Facebook icon Facebook icon Follow Us on Pinterest

editor’s picks